XTAR Moon RC2 Rechargeable Light

As I have said many times before, one of the things that I enjoy most about reviewing products is running across unique items from lesser known companies within the trail and ultra space.  While the big names continue to bring us new, innovative products, I have had the best luck with companies that aren’t so entrenched in the space.  They often tend to think a little outside of the box.  The Moon RC2 rechargeable light from XTAR is one such item.  Let’s have a look!

Product Overview

The XTAR Moon RC2 is shaped like an egg and only a tad bit larger.  It comes with a clip on the back that is used to secure it in place.  It offers flood-mode lighting in 4 levels:

  • High: 120 lumens / 4.2 hour runtime
  • Medium: 60 lumens / 9 hour runtime
  • Low: 30 lumens / 16 hour runtime
  • Moonlight: 3 lumens / 120 hour runtime

It is waterproof and offers a built-in battery that is rechargeable using Micro USB and at 87.5 grams, it is not too bulky either.  You can get a basic idea of the shape and size from the photo of the Moon RC2 in my hand.  The light is controlled by a single button on the top of the light that allows you to toggle between the four different light modes.  Here is a link to their product page as well for more details:

Moon RC2 Product Page


The easiest place to get your hands on one is at Amazon, and at $20, it is a pretty solid deal!

$19.99 at Amazon.com (click to view)

In Action

As with all of the reviews I write about lighting products, I like to show images that give you some feel for the light coverage.  On the left, you will see an image of the light in HIGH mode and on the right, you will see the light in LOW mode.


The Moon RC2 does not offer a beam mode, but as you can see, it is capable of outputting a good amount of light.  I found it to be pretty ample for running, but I did find myself missing beam mode for those times when I wanted to focus on something in the distance.  What I liked most about it was the ability to clip it on to pretty much anywhere.  While running, I clipped it on to the waistband of my shorts.  It provided for a great light angle and didn’t slide around at all.  The clip is strong enough to hold it securely in place, whether you want to clip it on to your shorts, water bottle holster, or hydration pack.  This versatility may be the best thing about the Moon RC2.  In terms of battery life, it was on par with other lights that have similar lumen output, but the lack of a swappable battery does make it difficult to use as a primary light for all night runs.


  • Can clip it anywhere making it versatile for many types of use.
  • Light quality was good.
  • Simple to use interface and easy to recharge.
  • Battery life was on par with competing products with similar lumen output.


  • No beam mode
  • No swappable battery

In general, while I am sure they could do some things to improve upon it, for the price and size/weight, the Moon RC2 will make a great backup light to keep around or to use for shorter distances in the dark.  Along with it’s versatile clip-on interface, I will find myself using it for many other purposes as well.  For example, it would be great as a secondary rear-racing light to put on my pack, camping, hiking, and even those times when you simply need a hands-free light.  Worth checking it out for sure!

If you like this post and would like to stay up to date when future gear reviews, race reports, and other related posts are released, please follow my Facebook page at Ultrarunner Joe!

Product Review: OOFOS Recovery Sandals

If you have ever run an ultra marathon or cheered someone on at the finish line, you are likely familiar with one common behavior that nearly everyone crossing the finish line exhibits – the overwhelming desire to take your shoes off almost immediately.  Speaking for myself, after 6+ hours of running on technical terrain, my feet are sore and want freedom from my shoes.  Therein lies the problem; you want to take them off, but you still need to take care of your already thrashed feet.  I used to wear standard sandals, but they didn’t really provide much in terms of comfort or support.  A friend of mine suggested I try OOFOS and when I did, I knew I found my answer.  Let’s take a look!

DISCLAIMER: I am not affiliated with OOFOS in any way at the time of writing this review.  OOFOS did provide me with this product with no expectation of a review.  I am writing this review under my own direction and will look to provide honest, unbiased feedback.

Product Overview

OOFOS starts with their proprietary foam, which they call OOfoam.  Whereas traditional foam (like what you would find in running shoes) is designed for responsiveness, OOfoam serves the opposite purpose; it absorbs shock…up to 37% more than traditional foam according to OOFOS.  In addition, there are few few other benefits that resonate with me:

  • Unlike most sandals/flip-flops, they have tremendous arch support.
  • The foam maintains its shape and cushion for the entire life of the sandal.
  • They are shower ready and machine washable.

They offer three main styles to pick from as you can see below.  They are the OOahh Sport slide style sandal, the OOriginal flip-flop style sandal, and the OOcloog closed toe clog.  I will look at each one below.

Price: $45-60 at oofos.com (but you can sometimes find deals on Amazon.com after a quick search)

Before I get into each model more closely, let’s look at the outsole and talk a little bit about my overall experience with them.  The tread is the same on each model so you know what you are going to get.  As a recovery sandal, traction is not really my primary measurement, but I have found them to handle more than adequately.  Personally, I am more concerned with durability, stability, and comfort.

  • In terms of durability, I have gone from wearing them as post-run recovery sandals to everyday casual footwear so, needless to say, I have put quite a few miles on them.  Every model I have tried seems to hold up quite well.  Aside from being dirty and maybe a little worn, they look just about the same as when I took them out of the box.  Depending on your use, I am sure you could get several years/500+ miles out of a pair.
  • As a cushiony recovery shoe, one concern for some would be stability; would they be squishy and wobbly?  The short answer is no.  I would say that they are squishy where it counts; I have never felt like was was going to roll an ankle or anything because of an unstable platform.
  • When it comes to comfort, this is what sold me.  Their OOfoam creates the most comfortable footwear I have ever stepped into.  They feel great post run and I even wear them when I am working at my standing desk or just walking around.

So let’s take a look at some pictures of the three models and a few specific thoughts:


If you like flip flops, this is the way to go.  That being said, I found there to be a bit too much foam on the post in between the toes which I was a bit uncomfortable for me.


The OOcloog is easy to take on and off, but I am not so sure that the clog look is back in style yet.  :-)  On the flip side, I still wear them frequently because the closed-toe design provides a little more protection.  Plus, no one wants to have to look at my gross runners feet.  I also noticed that there seems to be a bit more support in the arch versus the other two models.


Really not much to say about this one other than this is my favorite model.  They have a good look and are easy to slide off and on.  Really a great fit overall!

If you want my true opinion, I think these need to be in the finish line bag of every ultra runner.  It is important to take care of your feet after a long race and I have yet to find anything better.  Beyond long distance running though, if you are someone that spends a lot of time on your feet or just has problems with sore feet in general, you should consider a pair of OOFOS too.  You will be thankful on those days when you want to give your feet a break.

If you like this post and would like to stay up to date when future gear reviews, race reports, and other related posts are released, please follow my Facebook page at Ultrarunner Joe!

TNFECS Utah 50K (Sorta) 2016 Race Report

Well, that was one helluva way to end my season.  My goal was to run a fast 50K to finish my 2016 races on a strong note, but Mother Nature had something quite different in store for me at The North Face Endurance Challenge Utah this year.  Watching the weather forecast all week was depressing, with constant rain and snow predicted for 2 1/2 straight days leading into the race on Saturday.  As it came closer, I decided to accept that I would be dealing with the adverse conditions and make the best of it, even if it wasn’t what I was hoping for.

The race had a scheduled start of 7:00am on Saturday morning.  Living about 45 minutes away, I decided to sleep in my own bed the night before and drive up in the morning.  Since I don’t like to feel rushed, I got there at about 6:15 only to find out that the race start was delayed until 8:00.  To pile on to it, at about 7:15, the race crew made the announcement that the 50 Milers that started a couple hours earlier were being rerouted because the upper half of the mountain was experiencing white out conditions and the course markers were buried in snow.  We too would now be running a modified course; two loops of the half marathon course.  So, my 50K turns into a Marathon at the last minute…oh well, you can’t control the weather and I was already there so I might as well MAN UP!

We started out on the trail in three waves with instructions on the new route to help spread us out on the single track.  I took off in the first wave and we immediately went the wrong way.  By the time we figured it out, we tacked on an extra half mile and ended up behind most of wave 2 and 3.  This created quite the bottleneck as we all tried to swerve around people in the mud (not always so gracefully).  The first climb is supposed to go up over 3,000 feet to Jupiter Peak, but instead, we went up about 1,400 feet before we started cutting across the middle of the mountain to the other side to run down.  There were a few sections on the first loop that were actually pretty runnable and I moved as fast as I could.  I didn’t take a lot of pictures because I was too busy trying to not fall on my ass, but I did steal a few from other people so you can get a sense for what we were dealing with.  I am happy to report that although I had to move slower at times, I did manage to stay upright the whole time!

TNF Ryan Delany.jpg
PC: Ryan Delany

TNF Alan Griffin 1.jpg
PC: Alan Griffin

We ended up having three aid stations per loop and I was impressed with how well stocked they stayed for the entire race and how friendly the volunteers were.  They were all super helpful, despite probably dealing with a higher percentage of grumpy runners than normal.  Thanks to all of you volunteers!

I ended up doing the first loop in around 2:30, which I was pretty happy with given the conditions, however, the second loop was a slightly different story.  As I started back the second climb, I started to have some stomach issues.  It ended up being nothing major and settled down after about five miles, but it did make it painful to run for a few miles there.  In most cases, the uphill grade on this course would be runnable for me, but with the conditions and the stomach pain, I decided to hike most of it on this lap so that I didn’t dig myself into a bigger hole.  I think this ended up being smart as I was able to rally, although it did cost me a bit of time.  The other significant issue on the second lap were the trail conditions.  While manageable on the first lap for the most part, by the time I came through for the second lap, they were torn up after all of the foot traffic that had been passing through.  This too contributed to slowing me down a bit more than I was hoping.

As I crossed the finish line, I ended up doing the second lap about 30 minutes slower than the first with an overall time of 5:28:07.  Good for the top 30% of finishers.  The conditions weren’t ideal and definitely exposed some of my weaknesses (being a skittish downhill runner for example), but I can’t really complain all that much.  Given all of the injuries I had this year, it was good to get through the race without any setbacks.  I also managed to get across the finish line before Rob Krar finished the 50 Miler, so that is good in my book.  Even though he is a beast, he did start three hours before me and I never like getting passed up by people running longer distances🙂

Screen Shot 2016-09-25 at 4.58.36 PM.png
PC: Ryan Delany

For now, I am going to enjoy my off season and getting to run for fun without having to focus on a particular race.  I also plan on doing quite a bit more strength training ahead of the 2017 race season to help combat some of these injuries that popped up on me from happening more often.  Don’t worry though, just because race season is over doesn’t mean you won’t find me out on the trails all winter…afterall, I am a trail addict!


  • Hard to talk about pros when a race does not go at all as you expected.  Still, I will say that the volunteers went above and beyond during this event.  They dealt wonderfully with the conditions and were quick to deal with the last minute modifications.
  • Despite being wet and muddy, the scenery for this race is amazing.  This year in particular, you got to see Fall and Winter battle it out…it was pretty nice.


  • While not part of the normal course, because the 50 Mile, 50K, and Marathon runners all ended up doing laps on the same trail, it was pretty crowded and got pretty sloppy.  That being said, this was the exception that the weather brought this year.  I ran this race before and can say it is definitely not the norm.
  • My biggest complaint was how they handled the weather.  Given that the weather was expected all week, I felt they should have made the course changes at least the night before to give runners more advanced warning.

2016 was mentally tough for me.  It has been one with random nagging injuries that never allowed me to get the momentum that I was hoping for.  They were frustrating, which definitely took a toll on me mentally too.  Despite that, I still had my fair share of people cheering me on.  Thanks to my friends and family for their continued support.  Thank you to the crew and volunteers for dealing with the elements to make sure us runners were taken care of.  Lastly, thanks to all of my sponsors for enabling me with the best gear ever.  Please show your love and check out my “What I Use” page for discounts on everything that I use and trust!  Here is what I used.

  • Topo Athletic Hydroventure: This is the best waterproof shoe on the market.  26+ miles of wet, muddy trails and my feet stayed completely dry.  Unreal!
  • Injinji Trail 2.0 Crew Sierra: Love the designs on the new Injinji trail socks and as always, no blisters.
  • Orange Mud Vest Pack 1: Light, with enough room for the water and food I need to get me from one aid station to the next on race day.
  • Headsweats Go Hat: If you wear hats on race day, there isn’t a better one out there.
  • RAD Roller and Rod: I always need to take care of the muscles after a great run.

If you like this post and would like to stay up to date when future gear reviews, race reports, and other related posts are released, please follow my Facebook page at Ultrarunner Joe!